Renting the Premises at the Ångström Laboratory

It is possible to rent teaching rooms and lecture halls for conferences and meetings if the rooms are vacant, but teaching is always prioritized.

For conferences and other events Eva von Bahr Auditorium, Heinz-Otto Kreiss Hall and Sonja Lyttkens Hall in house 10 as well as Siegbahn Hall, Hägg Hall and Polhem Hall in house 1 is most suitable. In addition other premises such as classrooms and seminar rooms can also be booked for various purposes that fall within the framework of the university's rental policy. From June to mid-August, there are often many vacant premises.

Contact the reception at the Ångström Laboratory for more information about prices, availability and booking.

Hägg Hall

The Hägg Hall (10132) can be found in the Ångström Laboratory.

The equipment in the hall consists of a slide, projector, document camera, fixed microphones, headset microphone, chalk boards, whiteboard and a built-in hearing loop.

The hall is named after Gunnar Hägg (1903-1986) who was a professor of inorganic chemistry at Uppsala University. He is considered the foremost inorganic chemist in Sweden during the 20th century.

Polhem Hall

The Polhem Hall (10134) can be found in the Ångström Laboratory.

The equipment in the hall consists of a slide pojector, video projector, document camera, fixed microphones, headset microphone, chalk boards, whiteboard and a built-in hearing loop.

The hall is named after Christopher Polhem (1661-1751), a student at Uppsala University and later a successful inventor and industrialist.

Siegbahn Hall

The Siegbahn Hall (10101) can be found in the Ångström Laboratory.

The equipment consists of slide projector, projector, document camera, DVD player, fixed microphones, headset microphone, handheld microphones, chalkboards, whiteboard and a built-in hearing loop.

The hall is named after Kai Siegbahn (1918-2007) who was professor of experimental physics at Uppsala University from 1954 to 1984. Kai received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1981 just like his father Manne Siegbahn (1886-1978), who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1924.

Last modified: 2022-09-23